Middle School Math iPod Touch Blog

Integrating Technology into the Middle School Classroom

GAMeSlab at RU offers good videos to help teachers new to using iPods in the classroom. April 22, 2011

What I like about the teaching profession is the collaboration among teachers, because we each have our own, creative ideas. As new teachers, the lack of immediate resources is one of the greatest struggles. When teachers work together, sharing ideas and pedagogy, we all become our best and the students benefit the most.

The GAMes lab at Radford University offers some good videos showing how some teachers are using iPods and iPad in the classroom. Twitter is another resource from some excellent ideas, if you have time to sort through the ideas. Another way of sharing and obtaining resources is through blogs by other educators and technology users. The most important thing is to be creative, reflect on your students’ behaviors and engagement, and build (and keep in contact with) your own PLN and PLC. All teachers need support, but especially new teachers need to know how to survive those first, most difficult years. I hope these suggestions help, especially when you are trying to incorporate technology into your classroom!

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A lonely student with hearing loss needed a friend. My student’s best friend today was an iPod :)

Our school does an excellent job of trying to provide positive reinforcement opportunities for each child. In middle school, this is not always an easy task. One thing that we do is give coupons to students who have made good behavior choices during a certain timeframe. This time our coupons provided students with the opportunity to wear a hat, or sit with a friend at lunch.

One of my sweet students, whom I will call Brian, is totally deaf and has Asperger’s. He can be a neat kid, who adds a lot to our classroom. He is the only student with hearing loss in seventh grade, although there are several other students with hearing loss at our school. During lunch, he typically sits by himself and eats his same lunch in the same order each day. He likes it this way. Routine makes him comfortable, although many of our hearing students don’t understand this. They, enjoying time with him and wanting to help Brian feel included, ask to sit with him and write on a dry-erase board or paper to talk with him during lunch. We usually agree to let them try, but it doesn’t take long before the other student learns Brian would rather sit quietly.

Upon being praised for excellent behavior this quarter, Brian was offered a coupon and he chose a sit with a friend pass. In my less than stellar signing ability I asked if he had a friend he wanted to sit with during lunch to use his pass. He said no, he just wanted to sit and eat. Knowing how big he smiles when we use the iPod Touch in math class, I asked him if he would like to take it to lunch the next day.  It was a no-brainer! He smiled and said yes.

Today, he quickly ate his bag lunch as usual, but then with excitement reached for the iPod. I am now thinking of utilizing the iPod as a lunch buddy for Brian on special occassions. I am excited about looking for an app that teachers sign language (I know I have seen one before) and loading it on to the iPod. Then, some students can learn some signs in order to be able to have small conversations with Brian. Then, when he gets an “eat lunch with a friend” pass, he can use the iPod and another student can play apps with him and sign as well, after having learned some sign language.

I just wanted to share this story because we all know how iPods can help keep students engaged, it can differentiate instruction, and make learning fun. Now, it can help students build relationships by learning to communicate and can be a “friend” to a student in need.

 

Making Math Movies- Pros and Cons April 18, 2011

My students worked so hard on their movies this week using the MacBooks, keynotes and lots of their own creativity and excitement. This was a wonderful thing to see! I have had some wonderful suggestions on how to reach students without internet access at home. Some of the ideas include making dvds for them to use with computer, dvd player or x-box. Wow! Great ideas…I didn’t realize you could play dvds in gaming systems. I tried making a sample dvd and it worked great, so my student developers and I were even more motivated once they saw a sample.

So, those are clearly “pros”. Now, I have a few “cons”. Unfortunately, students were not able to use the recorder option in keynotes to record their voices to their presentations. I am not sure if this is a bandwidth issue, since our school struggles with this issue. Now, because I have spent 3 class days making wonderful videos, I am planning to load them onto iPods for students without the voice recording. This can always be added later. I am going to hold off on the dvds in light of the glitch, which is upsetting because I really wanted those dvds out to families to use for SOL reviews. I will have to keep trying, and find a way to help my students find success with such a worthwhile project that they really enjoyed.

 

Blogs about using iPod Touch in Middle School April 6, 2011

The internet and the world of blogging has made networking between educators much easier! We are so fortunate to live in a time where we can have advice of other teachers at the tip of our fingers, and a wealth of resources are available for those attempting to incorporate technology into the classroom. Here are just a few of the sites I prefer to follow for blogs related to educational technology, middle school math, iPod Touch, and teaching in a web 2.0 world.

Please feel free to contact me by comment if you would like to see your blog included in my list. Thanks to all fellow bloggers for your continued support and information you share with others every day!

http://myedet650.blogspot.com/

http://dlane650.blogspot.com/

http://edet650kknachel.blogspot.com/

http://ipoduseforsolremediation.blogspot.com/

http://powertolearn.typepad.com/teacher_tech_blog/ipod/

http://educationtechnologyblog.com/

http://edtechlife.com/

http://www.edutopia.org/blogs

http://mscomputerteacher.com/2011/03/17/technology-in-education-ipods-and-the-ischool-initiative/

http://www.msteacher2.org/profiles/blog/list?tag=math

 

A new venture… Response Systems April 3, 2011

Filed under: iPod Touch — msmathteachr1 @ 10:18 pm
Tags: , , , , ,

   Our school system is looking into various response systems for us to use with out iPod Touches. I am interested in this, and of course would like something that does not require a great deal of time spent on preparing questions for the students. I am familiar with Google Forms and think they are very beneficial, although not friendly to math questions that involve fractions. I may have to play with this a bit more and just become more comfortable with it. My students have said they feel it is too hard to see the questions on the small screen of the iPod, even though they have the ability to increase the magnification of the image.  What I do like is the immediate feedback and the ability to view data immediately.

  Tony Vincent has some other suggestions for response systems that I am interested in trying out. Check out his blog and see his suggestions. He has a wealth of information and is kind enough to share it with those of us still learning about the technology.  http://learninginhand.com/blog/four-student-response-systems.html

  So this is my goal for this week; I will try one of the response systems to see how my students and I feel it works out as a formative assessment. I will be sure to let you know how it goes!

 

Favorite Uses for iPods in Education March 31, 2011

  I feel like this past week everything fell in place with the iPods. My students are very comfortable with ScribbleLite (which I believe is fabulous), and are getting much better with using the iPod as a response tool. They would much rather draw a function table in ScribbleLite and save it as a photo for their friends to solve, than do a worksheet or even Powerpoint. They enjoy the device, but they really appreciate how it can be used as an interactive tool.

  Some other students appreciated being able to listen to a video to remind themselves of a past concept in math class. One student replayed a portion of it several times, which I really enjoyed seeing.  I don’t believe that student would have asked me to repeat myself if I taught the concept in front of class, but because I was on video he could pause and rewind at his leisure. Flashcards are great for individual studying or review of concepts, and of course many apps provide needed practice of skills.

  So, the students enjoy them, I enjoy them, and they are being kept very busy these days. I’m always open to new ideas, so if you have any suggestions for uses in a middle school math classroom let me and others know! Thanks!